Monthly Lecture, November 8: Martin Chodorow, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY

International Linguistic Association Monthly Lecture Series

When: Saturday, November 8, 2014 at 11 AM – 12 PM

Where: Borough of Manhattan Community College, Room: Richard Harris Terrace (next to the bookstore), 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007

FREE EVENT! No RSVP necessary!

———————

Automated Writing Evaluation: Grammar, Usage, Mechanics, and Beyond

Advances in Natural Language Processing (NLP) have led to improvements in automated systems which identify writing errors involving grammar, word usage, spelling and punctuation. Detecting these errors is an important part of automated essay scoring for high-stakes tests, and it is also valuable in low-stakes instructional settings for providing feedback to writers. This talk presents some of the challenges that researchers face in automatically identifying and correcting even relatively low-level errors. It also describes how NLP techniques are being used to evaluate higher-level writing constructs, such as discourse coherence.

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Monthly Lecture, October 11: Aurora Donzelli, Sarah Lawrence College

International Linguistic Association Monthly Lecture Series

When: Saturday, October 11, 2014 at 11 AM – 12 PM

Where: Borough of Manhattan Community College, Room: Richard Harris Terrace (next to the bookstore), 199 Chambers Street, New York, NY 10007

FREE EVENT! No RSVP necessary!

———————

The Last Ray of the Empire

Creolized Tongues and Lusophonic Ideologies of Purity in a Former Portuguese Colony

 In Portugal, the discourse of “Lusophony” has been instrumental in repackaging the national colonial nostalgia as an apparently inclusive, progressive, and cosmopolitan form of postcolonial identity. In this vein, Pessoa’s famous line “My homeland is the Portuguese language” has been often deployed to reconcile a Romanticist nationalist language ideology (Bauman and Briggs 2000; Silverstein 2000) with the ideal of a ‘pluri-continental’ cultural community encompassing metropolitan Portugal and its former colonies. However, this metaphorical representation of “language” as “place” and the “ecumenical” (Pina-Cabral 2010) transformation of “Lusophony” into “Lusotopy”, enthusiastically embraced by many Portuguese intellectuals and politicians, leaves a fundamental question unanswered: “whose Portuguese?” This talk seeks to answer this question by examining the tension between standard and non-standard varieties of Portuguese in Portugal’s easternmost ex-colony (East Timor), where Portuguese was recently (2004) and somewhat unexpectedly proclaimed the official medium of instruction.

Drawing on interviews with Eastern Timorese and Portuguese language teachers and planners, I discuss how East Timor’s choice of “returning” to the language of a former colonial elite confronted local teachers with the dilemma of either teaching Portuguese as a “native language” to students who barley spoke it, or resorting to L2 pedagogical techniques that undermined the Lusophonic beliefs in the local existence of a native Portuguese speech community. At the same time, classroom interactions video-taped in East Timor in 2008 reveal strong attachments to a purist view of standard Portuguese. These data show how a diffuse concern for the potential creolization of the standard resulted in linguistic routines and exercises centered on rote memorization of verbal paradigms. These exercises aimed at countering the risk of the erosion of Portuguese’s verbal morphology while reaffirming a colonial linguistic regime based on the exoticization and elevation of Portuguese’s radical otherness and higher morphological “complexity” vis-à-vis the tenselessness of the local languages.

My multi-sited ethnographic fieldwork in Portugal and East Timor suggests that the cosmopolitan and liberal discourse of “Lusophony” is fraught with profound anxieties and contradictions. While recent scholarship highlighted how colonial regimes in Southeast Asia produced modes of governmentality geared to increasing racial distinction (Anderson 1995, 2006; Rafael 1993, 1995; Stoler 1989, 1991, 1995, 2001) through the management of everyday life, relatively little attention has so far been paid to linguistic practices and ideologies. This talk offers a contribution in this direction via a microscopic analysis of the practices currently deployed in East Timor to foster the role of Portuguese as the official language of teaching and learning. In so doing, it problematizes the equivalence between language, culture, and place underlying the Portuguese postcolonial fantasy of a transnational speech community and shows how, once relocated in a former colony, the inclusive multiracial and multicultural celebration of Portuguese as a world language may reveal its colonial matrix: i.e., an exclusionist ideology of linguistic and racial purism.

 Contact: Maureen Matarese, mmatarese@bmcc.cuny.edu                 www.ilaword.org

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2014 ILA Conference, May 22-14: Full program available

The International Linguistic Association 59th Annual Conference, Paris, France, Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, May 22-24, 2014

For the 2014 Conference Program, click here:

ILA Program

Visit the University Panthéon-Assas website here:

http://www.u-paris2.fr/1400657377903/0/fiche___actualite/&RH=ACCUEIL_FR

In 1943, a group of linguists at colleges and universities in the New York area, including many members of the École Libre des Hautes Études in exile, came together to form the Linguistic Circle of New York. The model for the new organization was the Société de Linguistique de Paris. Among the first members were Henri F. Muller, Giuliano Bonfante, and Roman Jakobson.

In recognition of the French roots of the International Linguistic Association, the Conference will be held on May 22-24, 2014 at the Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, in Paris, France.

The Linguistics of Rhetoric and Debate, with a special section on Forensic Linguistics

Rhetoric has developed as a discursive discipline whose primary purpose is one of persuading the hearer to adopt the speaker’s point of view. The debate uses rhetorical discourse to present opposing arguments to an audience, until the audience, or members of it, adopts one side or the other as the more reasonable argument. Linguistic studies have sought to analyze the structure of discourse in order to find syntactic, semantic and pragmatic patterns that make rhetorical texts effective in changing the audience’s mind. The organizers of the ILA’s 59th Annual Conference solicit papers on linguistic approaches to the study of rhetoric and debate, with the intention of encouraging renewed interest in the subject at a time when debate is conducted in greatly expanded arenas and in new communicative conditions.

A special section of the conference will consist of a Forensic Linguistics panel, and a Plenary presented by Dr. Robert Leonard and Dr. Tammy Gales from Hofstra University.

The languages of the Conference are English and French with plenary talks in English.

Annika Wendt, Coordinator at awendt@ilaword.org

Inquiries may be sent to: Co-Chairs, Kathleen O’Connor-Bater, oconnorbaterk@oldwestbury.edu or Kathryn English, kathryn.english@u-paris2.fr

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2014 ILA Conference

The International Linguistic Association 59th Annual Conference, Paris, France, Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, May 22-24, 2014

In 1943, a group of linguists at colleges and universities in the New York area, including many members of the École Libre des Hautes Études in exile, came together to form the Linguistic Circle of New York. The model for the new organization was the Société de Linguistique de Paris. Among the first members were Henri F. Muller, Giuliano Bonfante, and Roman Jakobson.

In recognition of the French roots of the International Linguistic Association, the Conference will be held on May 22-24, 2014 at the Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, in Paris, France.

The Linguistics of Rhetoric and Debate, with a special section on Forensic Linguistics

Rhetoric has developed as a discursive discipline whose primary purpose is one of persuading the hearer to adopt the speaker’s point of view. The debate uses rhetorical discourse to present opposing arguments to an audience, until the audience, or members of it, adopts one side or the other as the more reasonable argument. Linguistic studies have sought to analyze the structure of discourse in order to find syntactic, semantic and pragmatic patterns that make rhetorical texts effective in changing the audience’s mind. The organizers of the ILA’s 59th Annual Conference solicit papers on linguistic approaches to the study of rhetoric and debate, with the intention of encouraging renewed interest in the subject at a time when debate is conducted in greatly expanded arenas and in new communicative conditions.

A special section of the conference will consist of a Forensic Linguistics panel, and a Plenary presented by Dr. Robert Leonard and Dr. Tammy Gales from Hofstra University.

The languages of the Conference are English and French with plenary talks in English.

Annika Wendt, Coordinator at awendt@ilaword.org

Inquiries may be sent to: Co-Chairs, Kathleen O’Connor-Bater, oconnorbaterk@oldwestbury.edu or Kathryn English, kathryn.english@u-paris2.fr

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2014 ILA Conference

The International Linguistic Association 59th Annual Conference, Paris, France, Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, May 22-24, 2014

In 1943, a group of linguists at colleges and universities in the New York area, including many members of the École Libre des Hautes Études in exile, came together to form the Linguistic Circle of New York. The model for the new organization was the Société de Linguistique de Paris. Among the first members were Henri F. Muller, Giuliano Bonfante, and Roman Jakobson.

In recognition of the French roots of the International Linguistic Association, the Conference will be held on May 22-24, 2014 at the Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, in Paris, France.

The Linguistics of Rhetoric and Debate, with a special section on Forensic Linguistics

Rhetoric has developed as a discursive discipline whose primary purpose is one of persuading the hearer to adopt the speaker’s point of view. The debate uses rhetorical discourse to present opposing arguments to an audience, until the audience, or members of it, adopts one side or the other as the more reasonable argument. Linguistic studies have sought to analyze the structure of discourse in order to find syntactic, semantic and pragmatic patterns that make rhetorical texts effective in changing the audience’s mind. The organizers of the ILA’s 59th Annual Conference solicit papers on linguistic approaches to the study of rhetoric and debate, with the intention of encouraging renewed interest in the subject at a time when debate is conducted in greatly expanded arenas and in new communicative conditions.

A special subsection of the conference will consist of a Forensic Linguistics panel which will immediately follow the Forensic Linguistics Plenary Speaker Dr. Robert Leonard.

The languages of the Conference are English and French with plenary talks in English.

Annika Wendt, Coordinator at awendt@ilaword.org

Inquiries may be sent to: Co-Chairs, Kathleen O’Connor-Bater, oconnorbaterk@oldwestbury.edu or Kathryn English, kathryn.english@u-paris2.fr

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2014 Conference

[English:]

The International Linguistic Association 59th Annual Conference, Paris, France, Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, May 22-24, 2014

Call for Papers

In 1943, a group of linguists at colleges and universities in the New York area, including many members of the École Libre des Hautes Études in exile, came together to form the Linguistic Circle of New York. The model for the new organization was the Société de Linguistique de Paris. Among the first members were Henri F. Muller, Giuliano Bonfante, and Roman Jakobson.

In recognition of the French roots of the International Linguistic Association, the Conference will be held on May 22-24, 2014 at the Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, in Paris, France.

The Linguistics of Rhetoric and Debate

Rhetoric has developed as a discursive discipline whose primary purpose is one of persuading the hearer to adopt the speaker’s point of view. The debate uses rhetorical discourse to present opposing arguments to an audience, until the audience, or members of it, adopts one side or the other as the more reasonable argument. Linguistic studies have sought to analyze the structure of discourse in order to find syntactic, semantic and pragmatic patterns that make rhetorical texts effective in changing the audience’s mind. The organizers of the ILA’s 59th Annual Conference solicit papers on linguistic approaches to the study of rhetoric and debate, with the intention of encouraging renewed interest in the subject at a time when debate is conducted in greatly expanded arenas and in new communicative conditions.

Topics that might be addressed under this theme include:

Pedagogical approaches to writing and composition
Legal language
Argument structure
Discourse analysis
Pragmatics
Persuasive writing and speechmaking
Syntactic argument                                                                                                                                    Visual
Classical approaches to rhetoric and interface with linguistics
Metaphor and cognition in argumentation
Humor and persuasion
Rhetoric and semiotics
Problems in translation
Semantic Syntactic interface
Oral and literate approaches to rhetoric, as described by Walter Ong                                         Digital Rhetoric and Debate

In keeping with the ILA tradition, we also invite papers on other areas of linguistics. Proposals may be submitted for individual presentations or for 90-minute panels comprising three or four speakers. Each presentation should last no more than thirty minutes, including time for questions and discussion. The languages of the Conference are English and French with plenary talks in English.

Submit abstracts (300 words or less) in English or French to the Conference Coordinator:

Annika Wendt, Coordinator at awendt@ilaword.org by Jan. 31, 2014

Inquiries may be sent to: Co-Chairs, Kathleen O’Connor-Bater, oconnorbaterk@oldwestbury.edu or Kathryn English, kathryn.english@u-paris2.fr

[French:]

59ème Conférence annuelle de l’Association Internationale de Linguistique, Paris France, Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas, du 22 au 24 mai 2014

Appel à Communications

En 1943, un groupe de linguistes appartenant aux Ecoles et universités de New York et qui comprenait de nombreux membres de l’Ecole Libre des Hautes Etudes en exil, se sont réunis dans le but de fonder le Cercle de linguistique de New York. Le modèle pour cette organisation nouvelle fut la Société de Linguistique de Paris. Parmi les premiers membres figuraient Henri F. Muller, Giuliano Bonfante, et Roman Jakobson.

En hommage aux racines françaises de l’Association Internationale de Linguistique, la Conférence cette année sera tenue à Paris, à l’Université de Paris II, Panthéon-Assas du 22 au 24 mai, 2014.

La linguistique de la rhétorique et de la joute oratoire

La rhétorique a évolué en tant que discipline discursive dont l’objectif principal est de persuader l’interlocuteur d’adopter le point de vu de l’orateur. La joute se sert du discours rhétorique afin de présenter des arguments contraires devant un auditoire jusqu’à ce que celui-ci, ou ses membres, adoptent le point de vue de l’un ou l’autre des orateurs, reconnaissant ainsi l’argument le plus raisonnable. Les études linguistiques s’attachent à analyser les structures du discours afin d’identifier les modèles syntaxiques, sémantiques et pragmatiques qui rendent un texte rhétorique efficace dans le but de faire changer d’avis un auditoire.

Les organisateurs de la 59ième Conférence annuelle sollicitent des communications sur l’étude de la rhétorique et la joute oratoire, avec en arrière fond l’intention d’encourager l’intérêt sur un tel sujet à une époque où les débats sont menés de nos jours dans un monde élargi et dans des conditions nouvelles de communication.

Les sujets qui pourraient être traités sous ce thème comprennent :

Approches pédagogique à l’écriture et la composition

Langue juridique

Structure de l’argument

Analyse de discours

Pragmatique

Ecriture persuasive et rédaction de discours

Argument syntaxique

Approches classiques à la rhétorique et son interface avec la linguistique

Métaphore et cognition dans l’argumentation

Humour et persuasion

Rhétorique et sémiotique

Problèmes de traductions

Interfaces sémantiques et syntactiques

Approches orales et écrites à la rhétorique telles que décrite par Walter Ong

Selon la tradition de l’Association Internationale de Linguistique, d’autres thèmes en linguistique peuvent être soumis. Les propositions peuvent être soumises par des chercheurs ou des panels de trois ou quatre personnes. Chaque présentation ne dépassera pas les trente minutes, incluant questions et discussion. Les langues de la Conférence sont l’anglais et le français. Les conférences plénières seront tenues en anglais.

Soumission des propositions en anglais ou français au coordinateur de la Conférence

Coordinateur

Annika Wendt (awendt@ilaword.org) au plus tard le 31 janvier 2014.

Responsables de l’organisation

Toute question relative à la Conférence peut être envoyée aux responsables en charge de l’organisation :

Kathleen O’Connor-Bater (oconnorbaterk@oldwestbury.edu)

ou

Kathryn English (Kathryn.English@wanadoo.fr)

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Monthly Lecture, Nov 9: Galina Bolden, Rutgers University

Saturday, Nov 9, 2013
11 AM – 12 PM
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Room: N452
199 Chambers Street
New York, NY 10007

FREE! No RSVP necessary!

Negotiating understanding in “intercultural moments” in immigrant family interactions

This paper examines the interactional construction of “intercultural moments” in conversation – moments during which cultural and linguistic differences between participants become exposed. I use the methodology of Conversation Analysis to analyze field video recordings of ordinary face-to-face interactions in Russian-American immigrant families. The paper focuses on sequences in which participants deal with (actual or anticipated) understanding problems and examines how participants’ assumptions about their asymmetric cultural and linguistic expertise are revealed in their actions. Interactional payoffs in adopting the role of a cultural expert vis-à-vis a novice are described to show how an ostensible non-understanding is both a participants’ problem to be solved and a resource for social action.

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Monthly Lecture, Oct 12: Andrea Parmegiani, Bronx Community College

Saturday, Oct 12, 2013
11 AM – 12 PM
Borough of Manhattan Community College
Room: N452
199 Chambers Street
New York, NY 10007

FREE! No RSVP necessary!

USING STUDENTS’ MOTHER TONGUES TO SUPPORT ACADEMIC SUCCESS IN A SECOND LANGUAGE: LESSON FROM SOUTH AFRICA AND BRONX COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Both the United States and South Africa are countries whose education systems are characterized by big achievement gaps. In the case of South Africa, it is evident that the dominance of English as a language of learning and teaching (Lolt) is a major reason for this gap. English is the home language of less than 9% of South Africa’s population, and the majority of native English speakers do not identify as black South Africans. Nevertheless, virtually all black South African students have to switch to English as Lolt after fourth grade. While black South African who can afford to attend racially integrated schools have a fairly good chance to master English for academic success, this is not the case for the vast majority of native speakers of African languages who continue to live in a racially segregated world.

Since the end of apartheid, a vocal “language rights discourse” among academic and intellectuals has been trying to counter the hegemony of English by promoting a greater use of African languages in domains of power, especially education. Several universities, including the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), have taken concrete steps by offering courses taught in indigenous languages. Ironically, the native speakers of these languages have generally been opposed to their use as media of instructions.

I will review some rhetorical pillars of the language rights discourse in South Africa, and argue that epistemological, political, and pedagogical limitations limit its power to promote African languages as Lolts. Based on an empirical study that I carried out at UKZN to investigate language attitudes among Zulu students, I will argue that English and students’ mother tongues should have a complementary – rather than a mutually exclusive – role in promoting ESL students’ success. Whenever possible, courses aimed at developing academic literacy in English should be integrated with courses that strengthen academic literacy foundations in the mother tongue.

I will conclude by reporting on a pilot project aimed at increasing ESL students’ success at Bronx Community College by linking an ESL course to a Spanish Composition course within the framework of a learning community.

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Monthly Lecture, May 11: Eileen Fitzpatrick, Montclair State University

Saturday, May 11, 2013
11 AM – 12 PM
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Room: L2.82
524 West 59th Street (between 10th and 11th Avenues)
New York, NY 10019

Detecting Deception in Civil and Criminal Narratives*

The talk will consider the reliability of using linguistic cues to identify deceptive and non-
deceptive regions in “real world” narratives — criminal statements, police interrogations
and legal testimony. To test the accuracy of these cues in predicting deception, we tagged
the narratives for 12 language-based deception cues as well as for the truth value of all
propositions that could be externally verified as true or false. A measure of the density of
cues was then calculated, with high cue density taken to identify a passage as deceptive.
This method was 74.9% accurate in predicting True/False on the externally verified
propositions, as compared to the baselines that range from 50-57%. This preliminary
result suggests that linguistic cues can provide a reasonable guide to the sectioning of
narratives into deceptive and non-deceptive statements.

*Joint work with the LinguisTech Consortium, Oxford NJ.

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Early conference registration has closed

58th Annual Conference of the INTERNATIONAL LINGUISTIC ASSOCIATION

April 12 – April 14, 2013
Kingsborough Community College, CUNY
Brooklyn, NY 11235

English—Global and Local

Conference program in PDF format.

Registration level
Institution

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